Use the box below to search for a medication.

*Federal Aviation Regulations prohibit the operation of an aircraft while that person knows or has reason to know of any medical condition or use of medication that would make the person unable to operate the aircraft in a safe manner.

ADD – While the FAA does not routinely evaluate the behavioral health of pilots, they do require applicants to voluntarily report all mental issues since birth. Despite widespread miss-interpretation by many pilot associations, the present FAA policy effectively prohibits the use of most psychotropic/mood ameliorating medications. The FAA has approved approximately fifty (50) Class-One airmen and less than 200 pilots in any certification class have been approved under the FAA’s antidepressant protocol.

In early 2010 the FAA announced isolated approval of four(4) antidepressants known as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI’s) such as Celexa (Citalopram Hydrobromide), Lexapro (Escitalopram Oxalate), Prozac (Fluoxetine Hydrochloride), Zoloft (Sertraline Hydrochloride).  Wellbutrin (Bupropion) was added in 2017 as another antidepressant which may also be acceptable on a case by case basis. Other medications not specifically listed may also be favorably considered by the FAA. While these medications may be approved, this rarely occurs and is generally not allowed if there is a significant medical diagnosis which requires medication to assure safe function and behavior.

The initial presentation of any psychiatric/psychological issue requires an evaluation irrespective of medication use.  This should be performed for the FAA by a private physician and reviewed confidentially by an expert to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.  This includes but is not limited to:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Attention Deficit
  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar
  • Personality Disorder
  • Substance Dependence or Abuse and the use of any psychotropic medication.

FAA psychiatric evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.   Before documentation is sent to the FAA it should be reviewed by an aeromedical document expert.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) are not authorized to approve certification for airmen with the aforementioned behavioral-medical history and they will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

AGE – There is no minimum or maximum age required for an FAA medical. The minimum age for a student pilot certificate is 16, therefore, anyone under the age of 16 can only obtain a medical certificate instead of the combination medical / student pilot certificate which is typically issued. The oldest active pilot with current medical certificate was Ralph Charles who was born November 6, 1899 and passed away Sunday, February 2, at the age of 103. “There never was a medical basis for making retirement mandatory at age 60,” says Hale, a commercial pilot. “That’s why it changed.” David Hale, Pilot Medical Solutions, Inc. (AARP Bulletin)

AIDS – HIV seropositive pilots (without AIDS manifestations) using FDA / FAA approved antiviral medication may obtain FAA medical certification.  The FAA requires an evaluation which must be accomplished in compliance with specific FAA requirements. Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and must defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Alcohol – The following briefly outlines allergy and cold medications which are approved by the FAA* on a case by case basis:
OVER-THE-COUNTER MEDICATIONS
Sudafed (pseudoephedrine) and Entex (phenylpropanolamine) are approved by the FAA provided they are not combined with an antihistamine. Over the counter medications – FAA publication

OTHER MEDICATIONS
Vitamin B-12 or other prophylactic injections are approved provided there are no side effects. Astelin (Azelastine), Dymista (Azelastine HCl / Fluticasone propionate), Claritin (Loratadine), Clarinex (Desloratadine) and Allegra (Fexofenadine) are acceptable to the FAA provided there are no adverse effects.

APPROVED INHALERS

  • Afrin (Oxymetazoline Hydrochloride)
  • Astelin (Azelastine) Case specific only
  • Atrovent (Ipratropium) Case specific only
  • Beconase (Beclomethasone Dipropionate)
  • Flonase (Fluticasone Propionate)
  • Nasalcrom (Cromolyn Sodium)
  • Nasalide (Flunisolide)
  • Vancenase (Beclomethasone Dipropionate)

Sedating medications are not acceptable.  This includes but is not limited to: Cetirazine (Zyrtec)and Dipenhydramine (Benadryl).
*It is assumed that allergies or colds being treated are not chronic, or severe and that medications will be used short term as directed by a physician.
 Research which illustrates the dangers of OTC Allergy / Cold Medications

Allergies – The following briefly outlines allergy and cold medications which are approved by the FAA* on a case by case basis:

OVER-THE-COUNTER MEDICATIONS
Sudafed (pseudoephedrine) Entex (phenylpropanolamine) are approved by the FAA provided they are not combined with an antihistamine. Over the counter medications – FAA publication

OTHER MEDICATIONS
Vitamin B-12 or other prophylactic injections are approved provided there are no side effects. Astelin (Azelastine), Dymista (Azelastine HCl / Fluticasone propionate), Claritin (Loratadine), Clarinex (Desloratadine) and Allegra (Fexofenadine) are acceptable to the FAA provided there are no adverse effects.

APPROVED INHALERS

  • Afrin (Oxymetazoline Hydrochloride)
  • Astelin (Azelastine) Case specific only
  • Atrovent (Ipratropium) Case specific only
  • Beconase (Beclomethasone Dipropionate)
  • Flonase (Fluticasone Propionate)
  • Nasalcrom (Cromolyn Sodium)
  • Nasalide (Flunisolide)
  • Vancenase (Beclomethasone Dipropionate)

Sedating medications are not acceptable.  This includes but is not limited to: Cetirazine (Zyrtec)and Dipenhydramine (Benadryl). 
*It is assumed that allergies or colds being treated are not chronic, or severe and that medications will be used short term as directed by a physician. Research which illustrates the dangers of OTC Allergy / Cold Medications

Anxiety – While the FAA does not routinely evaluate the behavioral health of pilots, they do require applicants to voluntarily report all mental issues since birth. Despite widespread miss-interpretation by many pilot associations, the present FAA policy effectively prohibits the use of most psychotropic / mood ameliorating medications. The FAA has approved approximately fifty (50) Class-One airmen and less than 200 pilots in any certification class have been approved under the FAA’s antidepressant protocol. In early 2010 the FAA announced isolated approval of four(4) antidepressants known as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI’s) such as Celexa (Citalopram Hydrobromide), Lexapro (Escitalopram Oxalate), Prozac (Fluoxetine Hydrochloride), Zoloft (Sertraline Hydrochloride).  Wellbutrin (Bupropion) was added in 2017 as another antidepressant which may also be acceptable on a case by case basis. Other medications not specifically listed may also be favorably considered by the FAA. While these medications may be approved, this rarely occurs and is generally not allowed if there is a significant medical diagnosis which requires medication to assure safe function and behavior. The initial presentation of any psychiatric / psychological issue requires an evaluation irrespective of medication use.  This should be performed for the FAA by a private physician and reviewed confidentially by an expert to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.  This includes but is not limited to:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Attention Deficit
  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar
  • Personality Disorder
  • Substance Dependence or Abuse and the use of any psychotropic medication.

FAA psychiatric evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.   Before documentation is sent to the FAA it should be reviewed by an aeromedical document expert. Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) are not authorized to approve certification for airmen with the aforementioned behavioral-medical history and they will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Arrhythmias – The initial presentation of any cardiovascular anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your personal physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.
This includes but is not limited to:

Asthma – The initial presentation of any pulmonary anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes:

  • Asthma
  • COPD
  • Emphysema
  • Tuberculosis
  • Lobectomy
  • Any other conditions, diseases or medication use related to the lungs.

FAA pulmonary evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific protocol.  Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service

Back Problems – The initial presentation of any physical / musculoskeletal issue requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.  This includes but is not limited to:

  • Surgical Procedures
  • Pain
  • Weakness
  • Paralysis
  • Motion Coordination
  • Limited Range of Motion or Functionality
  • The regular use of pain or anti-inflammatory medications.FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements.  In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Blood Donation – Pilots with a diagnosis of hypertension or those on medication to control blood pressure must provide a detailed cardiovascular evaluation for FAA consideration.  While the FAA essentially has no absolute requirements, the FAA requires an explanatory narrative, written by the treating physician, which must address the cause of the high blood pressure and rule-out disqualifying conditions such as heart disease.  The FAA will also request lab-work which the treating physician required to establish his/her position along with any other documentation related to accepted medical care standards. While aviation medical examiners may defer lower values, the FAA disqualifies pilots with a systolic (higher number) blood pressure at or above 155 or a diastolic (lower number) pressure at or above 95.

 Blood Pressure Optimal  Normal  High Normal  Hypertension  FAA Limit
 Systolic (top #) <120 <130 130-139 140 or higher 155 or higher
 Diastolic < 80 < 85  85-90  90 or higher   95 or higher
  

If your blood pressure is elevated, speak with your physician about how to reduce your blood pressure.  It may be possible to reduce your blood pressure by limiting the sodium (salt) in your diet, losing weight if overweight, taking medication, limiting your alcohol intake and/or increasing your physical activity.

Although reducing your blood pressure by lifestyle modification is preferred, it may be best to utilize medication initially to reduce the risk for arterial damage and stroke.  Eventually exercise and diet may permit you to discontinue the medication.

FAA Certification – FAA approved medications for hypertension  |  Other Cardiovascular Issues  |  FAA Standards & Protocols

Bipolar – While the FAA does not routinely evaluate the behavioral health of pilots, they do require applicants to voluntarily report all mental issues since birth. Despite widespread miss-interpretation by many pilot associations, the present FAA policy effectively prohibits the use of most psychotropic / mood ameliorating medications. The FAA has approved approximately fifty (50) Class-One airmen and less than 200 pilots in any certification class have been approved under the FAA’s antidepressant protocol. In early 2010 the FAA announced isolated approval of four(4) antidepressants known as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI’s) such as Celexa (Citalopram Hydrobromide), Lexapro (Escitalopram Oxalate), Prozac (Fluoxetine Hydrochloride), Zoloft (Sertraline Hydrochloride).  Wellbutrin (Bupropion) was added in 2017 as another antidepressant which may also be acceptable on a case by case basis. Other medications not specifically listed may also be favorably considered by the FAA. While these medications may be approved, this rarely occurs and is generally not allowed if there is a significant medical diagnosis which requires medication to assure safe function and behavior. The initial presentation of any psychiatric / psychological issue requires an evaluation irrespective of medication use. This should be performed for the FAA by a private physician and reviewed confidentially by an expert to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Attention Deficit
  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar
  • Personality Disorder
  • Substance Dependence or Abuse and the use of any psychotropic medication.

FAA psychiatric evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.  Before documentation is sent to the FAA it should be reviewed by an aeromedical document expert. Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) are not authorized to approve certification for airmen with the aforementioned behavioral-medical history and they will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

BPH (Blood Pressure) – Pilots with a diagnosis of hypertension or those on medication to control blood pressure must provide a detailed cardiovascular evaluation for FAA consideration.  While the FAA essentially has no absolute requirements, the FAA requires an explanatory narrative, written by the treating physician, which must address the cause of the high blood pressure and rule-out disqualifying conditions such as heart disease.  The FAA will also request lab-work which the treating physician required to establish his/her position along with any other documentation related to accepted medical care standards.

While aviation medical examiners may defer lower values, the FAA disqualifies pilots with a systolic (higher number) blood pressure at or above 155 or a diastolic (lower number) pressure at or above 95.

Blood Pressure   Optimal  Normal  High Normal  Hypertension  FAA Limit
 Systolic (top #) <120 <130 130-139 140 or higher 155 or higher
 Diastolic < 80 < 85  85-90  90 or higher   95 or higher

If your blood pressure is elevated, speak with your physician about how to reduce your blood pressure.  It may be possible to reduce your blood pressure by limiting the sodium (salt) in your diet, losing weight if overweight, taking medication, limiting your alcohol intake and/or increasing your physical activity.

Although reducing your blood pressure by lifestyle modification is preferred, it may be best to utilize medication initially to reduce the risk of arterial damage and stroke.  Eventually, exercise and diet may permit you to discontinue the medication.
FAA Certification – FAA approved medications for hypertension  |  Other Cardiovascular Issues  |  FAA Standards & Protocols

CAD / CHD (Cardiovascular) – The initial presentation of any cardiovascular anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your personal physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.
This includes but is not limited to:

Cardiovascular evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA Protocol / Standards. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Cancer – The discovery of a malignant or benign mass requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements. Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification for most malignant cases and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Cataracts – Pilot Medical Solutions has helped thousands of pilots with aeromedical certification issues. We work directly with private physicians and the FAA to assure compliance with FAA medical protocols and to resolve complex aeromedical certification issues quickly. Contact us at 800-699-4457 or via E-Mail to confidentially discuss the details of your case and to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. There is no charge for the initial consultation.

Will you pass the FAA’s eye exam?
Near Vision  |  Distant Vision  |  Visual Field  | Depth Perception  |  Color Vision

Cold – The following briefly outlines allergy and cold medications which are approved by the FAA* on a case by case basis:
OVER-THE-COUNTER MEDICATIONS:
Sudafed (pseudoephedrine) Entex (phenylpropanolamine) are approved by the FAA provided they are not combined with an antihistamine. Over the counter medications – FAA publication

OTHER MEDICATIONS
Vitamin B-12 or other prophylactic injections are approved provided there are no side effects.
Astelin (Azelastine), Dymista (Azelastine HCl / Fluticasone propionate), Claritin (Loratadine), Clarinex (Desloratadine) and Allegra (Fexofenadine) are acceptable to the FAA provided there are no adverse effects.

APPROVED INHALERS

  • Afrin (Oxymetazoline Hydrochloride)
  • Astelin (Azelastine) Case specific only
  • Atrovent (Ipratropium) Case specific only
  • Beconase (Beclomethasone Dipropionate)
  • Flonase (Fluticasone Propionate)
  • Nasalcrom (Cromolyn Sodium)
  • Nasalide (Flunisolide)
  • Vancenase (Beclomethasone Dipropionate)

Sedating medications are not acceptable.  This includes but is not limited to: Cetirazine (Zyrtec)and Dipenhydramine (Benadryl).  Research which illustrates the dangers of OTC Allergy / Cold Medications
*It is assumed that allergies or colds being treated are not chronic, or severe and that medications will be used short term as directed by a physician.
Federal Air Surgeon’s Medical Bulletin Cold Meds Article

Color Vision – Take a Color Vision Screening Test
The FAA accepts several different tests to meet the color vision requirements. You must be able to differentiate between Aviation Signal Red, Green and White.  If you do not pass the test given by the FAA medical examiner, you may take an alternate test. An FAA administered light gun signal test is one option, however, if you fail, you will have a permanent restriction precluding night flight and flight requiring light signal control. We Can Help! We have helped thousands of pilots with this process. We assist you by working with a private ophthalmological facility / practitioner to obtain alternative color vision testing which is acceptable to the FAA.  After obtaining the essential records, we work directly with the FAA to obtain approval.

Cognitive – While Aviation Medical Examiners do not typically perform formal or complete psychiatric evaluations, the examiner is expected to form a general impression of the emotional stability and mental state of the applicant. When cognitive issues are discovered or suspected, the FAA typically requires neuropsychological testing such as the Cogscreen test developed by Gary Kay.  This testing often reveals areas of both strengths and weakness.  In certain cases, the areas of weakness can be expeditiously rehabilitated by clinical programs, online training and even game applications which have been designed to reduce certain cognitive deficits. Comprehensive cognitive fitness programs designed specifically for pilots are available from Pilot Medical Solutions. Please contact us for more information.

COPD – The initial presentation of any pulmonary anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes:

  • Asthma
  • COPD
  • Emphysema
  • Tuberculosis
  • Lobectomy
  • Any other conditions, diseases or medication use related to the lungs.

FAA pulmonary evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific protocol.  Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Depth Perception

First & Second Class – Regarding depth perception, the FAA requires that pilots applying for First and Second Class FAA Medical Certification have Bifoveal fixation and vergence-phoria relationship sufficient to prevent a break in fusion under conditions that may reasonably be expected to occur in performing airman duties. Tests for the factors named in this paragraph are not required except for persons found to have more than 1 prism diopter of hyperphoria, 6 prism diopters of esophoria, or 6 prism diopters of exophoria. If any of these values are exceeded, the Federal Air Surgeon may require the person to be examined by a qualified eye specialist to determine if there is bifoveal fixation and an adequate vergence-phoria relationship. However, if otherwise eligible, the person is issued a medical certificate pending the results of the examination.
Thirst Class – No acute or chronic pathological condition of either eye or adnexa that interferes with the proper function of an eye, that may reasonably be expected to progress to that degree, or that may reasonably be expected to be aggravated by flying.

Depression – While the FAA does not routinely evaluate the behavioral health of pilots, they do require applicants to voluntarily report all mental issues since birth. Despite widespread miss-interpretation by many pilot associations, the present FAA policy effectively prohibits the use of most psychotropic / mood ameliorating medications. The FAA has approved approximately fifty (50) Class-One airmen and less than 200 pilots in any certification class have been approved under the FAA’s antidepressant protocol. In early 2010 the FAA announced isolated approval of four(4) antidepressants known as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI’s) such as Celexa (Citalopram Hydrobromide), Lexapro (Escitalopram Oxalate), Prozac (Fluoxetine Hydrochloride), Zoloft (Sertraline Hydrochloride).  Wellbutrin (Bupropion) was added in 2017 as another antidepressant which may also be acceptable on a case by case basis. Other medications not specifically listed may also be favorably considered by the FAA. While these medications may be approved, this rarely occurs and is generally not allowed if there is a significant medical diagnosis which requires medication to assure safe function and behavior. The initial presentation of any psychiatric / psychological issue requires an evaluation irrespective of medication use.  This should be performed for the FAA by a private physician and reviewed confidentially by an expert to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.  This includes but is not limited to:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Attention Deficit
  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar
  • Personality Disorder
  • Substance Dependence or Abuse and the use of any psychotropic medication.

FAA psychiatric evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.  Before documentation is sent to the FAA it should be reviewed by an aeromedical document expert. Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) are not authorized to approve certification for airmen with the aforementioned behavioral-medical history and they will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Diabetes – The initial presentation of any carbohydrate metabolism disorder requires an evaluation be performed to establish eligibility for certification.   This includes: Insulin or Non-Insulin dependant diabetes, and the use of any hypoglycemic medication.  FAA evaluations must be accomplished
in compliance with specific protocols. In most cases, an FAA designated Aviation Medical Examiner (AME) cannot approve FAA medical certification and must defer the application to the actual FAA in Oklahoma City. The FAA has an established policy that permits Special Issuance medical certification to insulin treated applicants on a case by case basis. Applicants must provide extensive medical documentation. If the FAA grants medical certification, the airman will be required to adhere to monitoring requirements and they are prohibited from operating aircraft outside the United States. An insulin using diabetic airman must carry a recording glucometer and monitor readings during flight in compliance with the FAA’s protocol. While all classes of FAA medical certification will be considered by the FAA, the United States Federal Air Surgeon has determined that Insulin Using Diabetics cannot be approved by Aviation Medical Examiners.   Class 3 applicants may be approved by the FAA’s Civil Aerospace Medical Institute in Oklahoma City.  First and Second class applicants must be evaluated and may be authorized by the Federal Air Surgeon’s Office in Washington, D.C.. The deferral process typically takes several months without our service.

Drugs (illegal) – The diagnosis or history of: Alcoholism, Substance Dependence, or Substance Abuse is disqualifying in the absence of favorable clinical evidence. According to the FAA, “Substance” includes: Alcohol; other sedatives and hypnotics; anxiolytics; opiods; central nervous system stimulant such as cocaine, amphetamines, and similarly acting sympathomimetic; hallucinogens; phencyclidine or similarly acting arylcyclohexylamines; cannabis; inhalants; and other psychoactive drugs and chemicals. The FAA defines “Substance dependence” as: A condition in which a person is dependent on a substance, other than tobacco or ordinary xanthine-containing (e.g., caffeine) beverages as evidenced by:

  • Increased tolerance
  • Manifestation of withdrawal symptoms
  • Impaired control of use; or
  • Continued use despite damage to physical health or impairment of social, personal, or occupational functioning

These issues typically require documentation of sustained abstinence and a psychiatric evaluation performed in compliance with FAA medical protocols.  Again, this includes:

  • Alcoholism
  • DUI’s and DWI’s
  • The use of PCP, Sedatives, Hypnotics, Anxiolytics, Marijuana, Cocaine, Opiates, Amphetamines, Hallucinogens, or other psychoactive drugs or chemicals.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.  In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

DVT – The initial presentation of many medical issues requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols (FAA Forms & Protocols). Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.  In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

DUI / DWI – The diagnosis or history of: Alcoholism, Substance Dependence, or Substance Abuse is disqualifying in the absence of favorable clinical evidence. According to the FAA, “Substance” includes: Alcohol; other sedatives and hypnotics; anxiolytics; opiods; central nervous system stimulant such as cocaine, amphetamines, and similarly acting sympathomimetic; hallucinogens; phencyclidine or similarly acting arylcyclohexylamines; cannabis; inhalants; and other psychoactive drugs and chemicals. The FAA defines “Substance dependence” as: A condition in which a person is dependent on a substance, other than tobacco or ordinary xanthine-containing (e.g., caffeine) beverages as evidenced by:

  • Increased tolerance
  • Manifestation of withdrawal symptoms
  • Impaired control of use; or
  • Continued use despite damage to physical health or impairment of social, personal, or occupational functioning

These issues typically require documentation of sustained abstinence and a psychiatric evaluation performed in compliance with FAA medical protocols.  Again, this includes:

  • Alcoholism
  • DUI’s and DWI’s
  • The use of PCP, Sedatives, Hypnotics, Anxiolytics, Marijuana, Cocaine, Opiates, Amphetamines, Hallucinogens, or other psychoactive drugs or chemicals.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.  In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Ear, Nose, Throat – The initial presentation of any Ear, Nose or Throat anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by a private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes:

  • Any disease or condition of the middle or internal ear, nose, oral cavity, pharynx, or larynx which interferes with, or may be aggravated by flying.
  • Any disease or condition which may interfere with clear and effective speech communication.
  • A disease or condition which may be manifested by vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium.

FAA Ear, Nose and Throat evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements.  Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

EKG – The initial presentation of any cardiovascular anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your personal physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.
This includes but is not limited to:

Cardiovascular evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA Protocol / Standards. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Eye – Pilot Medical Solutions has helped thousands of pilots with aeromedical certification issues. We work directly with private physicians and the FAA to assure compliance with FAA medical protocols and to resolve complex aeromedical certification issues quickly. Contact us at 800-699-4457 or via E-Mail to confidentially discuss the details of your case and to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. There is no charge for the initial consultation.

Will you pass the FAA’s eye exam?  Find out below below.
Near Vision  |  Distant Vision  |  Visual Field  | Depth Perception  |  Color Vision

Erectile Dysfunction – The initial presentation of many medical issues requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.   FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols (FAA Forms & Protocols). Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.  In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

 

Fatigue Management – The initial presentation of a sleep disorder requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Insomnia
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Narcolepsy
  • Restless Leg Syndrome
  • The use of sleep aiding medication or devices.

Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific FAA protocol. Authorization should be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.  In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service. We can help! We have helped thousands of pilots with this process. We work directly with your physicians and the FAA to assure compliance with FAA protocols and to resolve complex aeromedical certification issues quickly. Contact us at 800-699-4457 or via E-Mail to confidentially discuss the details of your case and to establish your eligibility for FAA Medical certification. There is no charge for an initial consultation.
Sleep Disorder Glossary  |  FAA Sleep Disorder Protocol  | Obstructive Sleep Apnea
    Sleep Hygiene Tips
1. Do not go to bed until you are drowsy. Many people go to bed before they are sleepy in an attempt to catch up on lost sleep time. The problem is, they don’t sleep, but end up worrying about their daily issues. Delaying sleep until drowsiness increases the chances of falling asleep and strengthens the association between bed and drowsiness.
2. Go to bed and get up at the same time. Maintaining a consistent schedule is one of the important time cues for the 24-hour circadian sleep-wake rhythm.
3. Do not take naps. Problem sleepers should avoid this.
4. Reduce or eliminate the use of alcohol. Do not drink alcohol later than 3 hours before bedtime.
5. Reduce or eliminate the use of caffeine. Do not use caffeine within 6 hours of bedtime.
6. Reduce or eliminate the use of nicotine. Do not smoke within 4 hours of your bedtime.
7. Exercise regularly, but avoid strenuous physical exertion after 6:00 p.m.
8. Eat a light carbohydrate snack before bed (crackers or an apple).
9. Adjust the sleep environment so that the temperature is comfortable and there are minimal levels of light and noise.
10. Remove all work or reminders of stressful things from the bedroom.  The bedroom should be reserved for sleep, sex or other relaxation.

Fatigue ManagementTips to stay alert on night or extended shifts from USAF War Fighter Fatigue Countermeasures:

  • Use caffeine as a stimulant when needed

  • Eat low carbohydrate, low fat, and high protein foods

  • Use social interactions and physical activity to help stimulate you in your work environment

  • Stay cooler than usual

  • Gradually adjust your sleep time before going on night shift

  • Nap as much as possible before the night shift begin

USAF Fatigue Management  |  American Academy of Sleep Medicine  | Desynchronosis  |  Melatonin

Fibromyalgia – The initial presentation of any physical / musculoskeletal issue requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.  This includes but is not limited to:

  • Surgical Procedures
  • Pain
  • Weakness
  • Paralysis
  • Motion Coordination
  • Limited Range of Motion or Functionality
  • The regular use of pain or anti-inflammatory medications.FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements.  In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Flexibility – Achieving and maintaining good physical flexibility is one of the key elements for preventing injuries and improving physical function.  Pilots are especially vulnerable to back problems and other injuries due to the sedentary nature of the job. The stretches below are designed to increase range of motion and prevent injuries. Use as directed by your physician.

  • Warm-up prior to stretching with light aerobic activity such as: walking, biking, jogging, etc.  See rating of perceived exertion on our basic exercise guidelines to define personal intensity values.
  • Hold each stretch at a moderate tension for at least 20 seconds.
  • Breathe deeply and exhale while working into the stretch.

Fitness – “Pilot Medical Solutions has a program with the dual objectives of helping pilots get in shape and assisting them in negotiating the medical process.” – Flying Magazine
Below you will find links to pilot health and fitness resources. You may also wish to check out pilot safety brochures.

Gall Bladder – The initial presentation of many medical issues requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.   FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols (FAA Forms & Protocols). Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.  In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service. Gender Dysphoria

Glaucoma – The initial presentation of Glaucoma requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for certification.  Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific FAA protocol.

GERD / G.I. – The initial presentation of any gastrointestinal issue requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for certification.  This includes but is not limited to: Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases including regional enteritis (Crohns’s disease), ulcerative colitis, and the use of any medication to manage G.I. conditions. FAA gastrointestinal evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific protocol. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Headache – The initial presentation of any neurological anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification.  This includes but is not limited to:

  • Severe Headaches
  • Seizures
  • Disturbance of consciousness or nervous system function
  • The use of any medication for treatment of a neurological condition.

FAA Neurological evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Heart – The initial presentation of any cardiovascular anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your personal physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes but is not limited to:

  • Arrhythmias
  • Hypertension
  • Angina Pectoris
  • Murmurs
  • Myocardial Infarction (heart attack)
  • Cardiac Valve Replacement
  • Permanent Cardiac Pacemaker
  • Coronary Heart Disease
  • Heart Transplant
  • Cardiovascular medication use
  • Cardiovascular evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA Protocol / Standards.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Hearing – Most applicants for FAA Medical certification will pass the typical Aviation Medical Examiner test outlined on the audio test page. Those who do not, are usually certified with a nominal limitation placed on their medical certificate. Pilots who require a hearing aid to meet FAA medical requirements will have the limitation “VALID ONLY WITH USE OF HEARING AMPLIFICATION” on their FAA medical certificate. This requirement is easily met using a standard amplified aviation headset. To view the audio test page and additional hearing information visit the hearing page.

Herbs – Herbal preparations, vitamins and supplements, like conventional medications, may have some potential benefits but unlike FDA regulated drugs, supplements often have unexpected adverse effects. Some herbs or supplements may cause positive results on DOT / FAA drug testing. Another problem, that some supplements create for pilots, is their effect on blood pressure, heart rate or other readings obtained during an FAA medical examination.

When considering FAA medical certification eligibility keep in mind that the FAA considers the medical condition being treated first. Some conditions are disqualifying with or without medications.

Anyone considering the use of supplements should research all products apart from claims made by the manufacturer or health advisors lacking adequate credentials and consult a physician. The following acronym may help:

Get a blood test to determine if you are actually deficient before supplementing
Avoid mega-doses of anything
Take a multi-vitamin only as needed
Eat a well balanced diet

Despite claims to the contrary, food is the best source for vitamins and nutrients. The table below identifies the nutrients obtained from foods:

The information below is provided as general education only and should be considered as an overview for Aviation Medical Examiners and pilots.

ALWAYS CONSULT A PHYSICIAN PRIOR TO USE

Hepatitis – The diagnosis or history of hepatitis and the use of alpha interferon is disqualifying until the condition is resolved and favorable clinical evidence is provided to the FAA. A detailed evaluation by your treating physician should be performed in compliance with FAA protocol. This includes Hepatitis A, B, and C.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) will not approve certification and defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

HIV – HIV seropositive pilots (without AIDS manifestations) using FDA / FAA approved antiviral medication may obtain FAA medical certification. The FAA requires an evaluation which must be accomplished in compliance with specific FAA requirements.

Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and must defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Hypertension – Pilots with a diagnosis of hypertension or those on medication to control blood pressure must provide a detailed cardiovascular evaluation for FAA consideration. While the FAA essentially has no absolute requirements, the FAA requires an explanatory narrative, written by the treating physician, which must address the cause of the high blood pressure and rule-out disqualifying conditions such as heart disease. The FAA will also request lab-work which the treating physician required to establish his/her position along with any other documentation related to accepted medical care standards.

While aviation medical examiners may defer lower values, the FAA disqualifies pilots with a systolic (higher number) blood pressure at or above 155 or a diastolic (lower number) pressure at or above 95.

 Blood Pressure Optimal  Normal  High Normal  Hypertension  FAA Limit
 Systolic (top #) <120 <130 130-139 140 or higher 155 or higher
 Diastolic < 80 < 85  85-90  90 or higher   95 or higher

If your blood pressure is elevated, speak with your physician about how to reduce your blood pressure. It may be possible to reduce your blood pressure by limiting the sodium (salt) in your diet, losing weight if overweight, taking medication, limiting your alcohol intake and/or increasing your physical activity.

Although reducing your blood pressure by lifestyle modification is preferred, it may be best to utilize medication initially to reduce the risk for arterial damage and stroke. Eventually exercise and diet may permit you to discontinue the medication.

Illegal Drugs – The diagnosis or history of: Alcoholism, Substance Dependence, or Substance Abuse is disqualifying in the absence of favorable clinical evidence.

According to the FAA, “Substance” includes: Alcohol; other sedatives and hypnotics; anxiolytics; opiods; central nervous system stimulant such as cocaine, amphetamines, and similarly acting sympathomimetic; hallucinogens; phencyclidine or similarly acting arylcyclohexylamines; cannabis; inhalants; and other psychoactive drugs and chemicals.

The FAA defines “Substance dependence” as: A condition in which a person is dependent on a substance, other than tobacco or ordinary xanthine-containing (e.g., caffeine) beverages as evidenced by:

  • Increased tolerance
  • Manifestation of withdrawal symptoms
  • Impaired control of use; or
  • Continued use despite damage to physical health or impairment of social, personal, or occupational functioning

These issues typically require documentation of sustained abstinence and a psychiatric evaluation performed in compliance with FAA medical protocols. Again, this includes:

  • Alcoholism
  • DUI’s and DWI’s
  • The use of PCP, Sedatives, Hypnotics, Anxiolytics, Marijuana, Cocaine, Opiates, Amphetamines, Hallucinogens, or other psychoactive drugs or chemicals.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Injury – Injuries which with previous or current physical or medical deficits requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.
This includes but is not limited to:

  • Pain, Weakness
  • Paralysis
  • Motion coordination
  • Limited Range of Motion or Functionality
  • Cardiovascular or Neurological Dysfunction and the regular use of any anti-seizure, psychotropic, pain or anti-inflammatory medications.

Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements. In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Insomnia – The initial presentation of a sleep disorder requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes but is not limited to:

  • Insomnia
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Narcolepsy
  • Restless Leg Syndrome
  • The use of sleep aiding medication or devices.

Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific FAA protocol.

Authorization should be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Intestinal – The initial presentation of any gastrointestinal issue requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for certification. This includes but is not limited to: Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases including regional enteritis (Crohns’s disease), ulcerative colitis, and the use of any medication to manage G.I. conditions.

FAA gastrointestinal evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific protocol.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Impotence – the initial presentation of many medical issues requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols (FAA Forms & Protocols). Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Immunization – While there is no published FAA position regarding immunizations, the FAA has suggested that a wait period of as much as 24 hours be utilized to observe any adverse effects. While there is no reporting requirements, pilots who have been immunized may wish to provide a note from the prescribing physician at the time of their next FAA exam. Read More by reading Immunizations and Flying By Major Donato J. Borrillo, MD, JD.

Kidney Stones – The history of kidney dysfunction requires an evaluation be provided, by your treating physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Renal(kidney) stones
  • Kidney failure
  • Nephritis
  • Nephrosis
  • Polycystic kidney disease
  • Pyelitis/pyelonephritis
  • Pyonephrosis
  • Tumors or malignancies and Nephrectomy.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Kidney Failure – The history of kidney dysfunction requires an evaluation be provided, by your treating physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Renal(kidney) stones
  • Kidney failure
  • Nephritis
  • Nephrosis
  • Polycystic kidney disease
  • Pyelitis/pyelonephritis
  • Pyonephrosis
  • Tumors or malignancies and Nephrectomy.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

LASIK – Eye or vision surgeries require a post-operative evaluation be performed by your private physician to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA protocol.

Leukemia – The initial presentation of many medical issues requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.

FAA Forms & Protocols

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Lyme Disease – The initial presentation of many medical issues requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.

FAA Forms & Protocols

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Lung Disease – The initial presentation of any pulmonary anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes:

  • Asthma
  • COPD
  • Emphysema
  • Tuberculosis
  • Lobectomy
  • Any other conditions, diseases or medication use related to the lungs.

FAA pulmonary evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific protocol. Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Melanoma – The discovery of a malignant or benign mass requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements.

Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification for most malignant cases and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Menier’s Disease – The initial presentation of motion sickness, dizziness or vertigo requires an evaluation be performed to establish the underlying cause and to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This is especially true if a medication has been utilized to treat or prevent motion sickness.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Mental – While the FAA does not routinely evaluate the behavioral health of pilots, they do require applicants to voluntarily report all mental issues since birth. Despite widespread miss-interpretation by many pilot associations, the present FAA policy effectively prohibits the use of most psychotropic / mood ameliorating medications. The FAA has approved approximately fifty (50) Class-One airmen and less than 200 pilots in any certification class have been approved under the FAA’s antidepressant protocol.

In early 2010 the FAA announced isolated approval of four(4) antidepressants known as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI’s) such as Celexa (Citalopram Hydrobromide), Lexapro (Escitalopram Oxalate), Prozac (Fluoxetine Hydrochloride), Zoloft (Sertraline Hydrochloride). Wellbutrin (Bupropion) was added in 2017 as another antidepressant which may also be acceptable on a case by case basis. Other medications not specifically listed may also be favorably considered by the FAA. While these medications may be approved, this rarely occurs and is generally not allowed if there is a significant medical diagnosis which requires medication to assure safe function and behavior.

The initial presentation of any psychiatric / psychological issue requires an evaluation irrespective of medication use. This should be performed for the FAA by a private physician and reviewed confidentially by an expert to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Attention Deficit
  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar
  • Personality Disorder
  • Substance Dependence or Abuse and the use of any psychotropic medication.

FAA psychiatric evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols. Before documentation is sent to the FAA it should be reviewed by an aeromedical document expert.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) are not authorized to approve certification for airmen with the aforementioned behavioral-medical history and they will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Migraine – The initial presentation of any neurological anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Severe Headaches
  • Seizures
  • Disturbance of consciousness or nervous system function
  • The use of any medication for treatment of a neurological condition.

FAA Neurological evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Motion Sickness – The initial presentation of motion sickness, dizziness or vertigo requires an evaluation be performed to establish the underlying cause and to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This is especially true if a medication has been utilized to treat or prevent motion sickness.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Multiple Sclerosis – The initial presentation of any neurological anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Severe Headaches
  • Seizures
  • Disturbance of consciousness or nervous system function
  • The use of any medication for treatment of a neurological condition.

FAA Neurological evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Myopia (nearsighted) – Pilot Medical Solutions has helped thousands of pilots with aeromedical certification issues. We work directly with private physicians and the FAA to assure compliance with FAA medical protocols and to resolve complex aeromedical certification issues quickly.

Contact us at 800-699-4457 or via E-Mail to confidentially discuss the details of your case and to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. There is no charge for the initial consultation.

Nose – The initial presentation of any Ear, Nose or Throat anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by a private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes:

  • Any disease or condition of the middle or internal ear, nose, oral cavity, pharynx, or larynx which interferes with, or may be aggravated by flying.
  • Any disease or condition which may interfere with clear and effective speech communication.
  • A disease or condition which may be manifested by vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium.

FAA Ear, Nose and Throat evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements. Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Neurology – The initial presentation of any neurological anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Severe Headaches
  • Seizures
  • Disturbance of consciousness or nervous system function
  • The use of any medication for treatment of a neurological condition.

FAA Neurological evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Nutrition – Good nutrition is added insurance for FAA Medical Certification. Eating right has several other benefits including: Blood Pressure and Cholesterol stabilization, the prevention of Heart Disease, weight management, the prevention or control of Diabetes, and equilibration of many other health parameters. Exercise also assures optimal health.
Contact Pilot Medical Solutions to receive individualized recommendations.

– Focus on things you should eat, not what you can’t eat
– Plan meals ahead with large quantities of low or non-fat food
– Get at least 7 hours of sleep nightly
– Drink plenty of water

Consult your physician before beginning any exercise or nutritional program.

Oncology – The discovery of a malignant or benign mass requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements.

Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification for most malignant cases and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Orthopaedics – The initial presentation of any physical / musculoskeletal issue requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

Physical – The initial presentation of any physical / musculoskeletal issue requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Surgical Procedures
  • Pain
  • Weakness
  • Paralysis
  • Motion Coordination
  • Limited Range of Motion or Functionality
  • The regular use of pain or anti-inflammatory medications.

FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements. In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Pain – Any chronic condition manifesting pain or requiring pain medication should be evaluated by your physician to determine if you can comply with FAR 61.53. Chronic conditions or those causing severe or limiting pain will be evaluated by the FAA to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. More Info: Pain Syndromes

FAA medical evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific FAA requirements.

Authorization should be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. Typically Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) will not approve certification and may defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

PregnancyFlying Pregnant – More than one solution for pregnant pilots and their employers

The guide to medical examiners states that performing flight duties is allowed during “normal” pregnancy. Normal is a relative term. Certainly there are unique medical and flight safety risk factors which are present even at conception. Even during the simplest of pregnancies, many women experience fatigue and nausea during the first trimester and almost all women experience fatigue and or nausea at some point during pregnancy.

One-third of pregnant women will deliver prior to their due date and 100% will be completely disabled at some point during pregnancy, yet the FAA’s only regulatory guidance is FAR 61.53. When paraphrased FAR 61.53 essentially says pilots must ground themselves if they know or have reason to know of any medical condition that would make them unable to meet the requirements or if they are taking medication or receiving treatment for a medical condition that renders them unable to meet the requirements. There is a wide range of interpretations of FAR 61.53 for pregnant pilots and while some believe these pilots should be grounded in the first trimester, others believe moms-to-be can fly two weeks beyond their due date.

Airline operators have long recognized the potential for negative outcomes in late pregnancy. Those not already on paid leave are usually transitioned to a desk job by the 30th week. While this is a workable solution for most airlines, fractional jet operators and corporate pilots may have fewer options.

Monetary and legal issues often eliminate options for corporate flyers, which are readily available to their airline counterparts.
In some cases pilots continue flying in order to remain on pay status while reducing safety margins for mother, baby and passengers.

Factors which may considerably reduce flight safety and classify a pregnancy as “abnormal” include: A history of multiple pregnancies, previous pre-term deliveries, cervical incompetence, bleeding, increased uterine activity,
reduced oxygen carrying capacity in the blood (anemia), reduced placential respiratory reserve such as intrauterine growth retardation, postmaturity, pre-eclampsia, chronic hypertension or placental infarction.

Flight during pregnancy increases the risk for:

  • Edema (swelling) and blood clot formation due to obstruction of the vena cava from uterine compression and lack of mobility
  • Reduced timely medical response due to the flight environment
  • Placental abruption which can be associated with minor abdominal traumaAdditional considerations include:
    Morning sickness, motion sickness, cockpit confinement, abdominal crowding-related to altitude expansion, control operation, baggage handling, frequent urination, difficulty in equalizing pressure due to tissue hyperplasia
    and passengers perception.

No two pilot pregnancies are alike. What is safe for one may be risky for another. Different flight operations require women to be informed and aware of the unique risk factors related not only to their pregnancy but to their specific flight operation. Employers should be as supportive as possible while advising pilots to consider both personal and flight safety ramifications.

Flying by the numbers – Most Pre-term deliveries occur after 28weeks. The odds are, most pilots will have a normal flight as most women will have a normal pregnancy. But if safety is the prime objective the pregnant pilot should honestly consider both FAR 61.53 and their fitness/functionality for events such as extreme turbulence or a crash. Pregnancy requires 9-14 doctor visits and 15-20% of women are hospitalized for non-delivery care. Women may have secondary problems from pregnancy such as poor / inadequate sleep, generalized discomfort, mood swings and urinary infections.

Most pilots would agree that taking unnecessary risks during flying is poor judgment but few pilots ask themselves the hard questions when they feel they must fly. Pregnant pilots should ask themselves hard questions:

(1) Is this pregnancy normal?
(2) Does this pregnancy pose significant vulnerabilities?
(3) Is flying this airplane or this specific flight operation risky for this pregnant pilot?
(4) Would I take this flight if it were not for the money?
(5) Am I taking an unnecessary risk?

If you have a high-risk pregnancy, we can help!

We have helped thousands of pilots with this process. We work directly with private physicians and the FAA to assure compliance with FAA regulations, to solve corporate obstacles and to resolve complex aeromedical certification issues quickly.

Presbyopia (farsightedness) – Pilot Medical Solutions has helped thousands of pilots with aeromedical certification issues. We work directly with private physicians and the FAA to assure compliance with FAA medical protocols and to resolve complex aeromedical certification issues quickly.

Contact us at 800-699-4457 or via E-Mail to confidentially discuss the details of your case and to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. There is no charge for the initial consultation.

Will you pass the FAA’s eye exam? Find out below.

Near Vision | Distant Vision | Visual Field | Depth Perception | Color Vision

Prostate – The initial presentation of a prostate condition requires an evaluation be performed to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes: prostate cancer, benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), and the use of medication to prevent or treat these conditions.

FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific medical protocol.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. Typically Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) will not approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Pulmonary – The initial presentation of any pulmonary anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes:

  • Asthma
  • COPD
  • Emphysema
  • Tuberculosis
  • Lobectomy
  • Any other conditions, diseases or medication use related to the lungs.

FAA pulmonary evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific protocol. Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Range of Motion – The initial presentation of any physical/musculoskeletal issue requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Surgical Procedures
  • Pain
  • Weakness
  • Paralysis
  • Motion Coordination
  • Limited Range of Motion or Functionality
  • The regular use of pain or anti-inflammatory medications.

FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements. In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Restless Leg Syndrome – The initial presentation of a sleep disorder requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes but is not limited to:

  • Insomnia
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Narcolepsy
  • Restless Leg Syndrome
  • The use of sleep aiding medication or devices.
  • Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific FAA protocol.

Authorization should be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Seizures – The initial presentation of any neurological anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Severe Headaches
  • Seizures
  • Disturbance of consciousness or nervous system function
  • The use of any medication for treatment of a neurological condition.

FAA Neurological evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Sleep Disorder – The initial presentation of a sleep disorder requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes but is not limited to:

  • Insomnia
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Narcolepsy
  • Restless Leg Syndrome
  • The use of sleep aiding medication or devices.

Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific FAA protocol.

Authorization should be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Smoking – The benefits of becoming smoke-free

While cigarette smoking is not prohibited by the FAA, it has several hazardous side effects and many health conditions caused by smoking are medically disqualifying.

A smoker typically carries a carbon monoxide blood level of about five percent. This may raise your physiological altitude from sea level to about 7,000 feet. A smoker is much more susceptible to hypoxia and can often feel the effects of hypoxia at lower altitudes.

Those who quit smoking immediately reduce their health risks and quickly derive many benefits:

  • Your chances of getting sick from smoking will be less.
  • You will have more energy and breathe easier.
  • If you are pregnant, your baby will get more oxygen and be healthier.
  • The people you live with, especially your children, will be healthier. Breathing in other people’s smoke can cause asthma and other health problems.
  • You will have more money to spend on things other than cigarettes.

There Has Never Been a Better Time to Quit
Smoking Cessation Tips:

  1. Assess the reasons you want to stop smoking and what stands in your way.
  2. Customize your stop smoking program by creating a plan which considers all obstacles and rallies all available support.
  3. Make plans to stop smoking.

More Information

Stent Implantation – The initial presentation of any cardiovascular anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your personal physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes but is not limited to:

Cardiovascular evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA Protocol / Standards.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Stomach – The initial presentation of any gastrointestinal issue requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for certification. This includes but is not limited to: Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases including regional enteritis (Crohns’s disease), ulcerative colitis, and the use of any medication to manage G.I. conditions.

FAA gastrointestinal evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific protocol.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Substance Abuse – The diagnosis or history of: Alcoholism, Substance Dependence, or Substance Abuse is disqualifying in the absence of favorable clinical evidence.

According to the FAA, “Substance” includes: Alcohol; other sedatives and hypnotics; anxiolytics; opiods; central nervous system stimulant such as cocaine, amphetamines, and similarly acting sympathomimetic; hallucinogens; phencyclidine or similarly acting arylcyclohexylamines; cannabis; inhalants; and other psychoactive drugs and chemicals.

The FAA defines “Substance dependence” as: A condition in which a person is dependent on a substance, other than tobacco or ordinary xanthine-containing (e.g., caffeine) beverages as evidenced by:

  • Increased tolerance
  • Manifestation of withdrawal symptoms
  • Impaired control of use; or
  • Continued use despite damage to physical health or impairment of social, personal, or occupational functioning

These issues typically require documentation of sustained abstinence and a psychiatric evaluation performed in compliance with FAA medical protocols. Again, this includes:

  • Alcoholism
  • DUI’s and DWI’s
  • The use of PCP, Sedatives, Hypnotics, Anxiolytics, Marijuana, Cocaine, Opiates, Amphetamines, Hallucinogens, or other psychoactive drugs or chemicals.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Stroke – The initial presentation of any cardiovascular anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your personal physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes but is not limited to:

Cardiovascular evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA Protocol / Standards.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Suicide Attempt – While the FAA does not routinely evaluate the behavioral health of pilots, they do require applicants to voluntarily report all mental issues since birth. Despite widespread miss-interpretation by many pilot associations, the present FAA policy effectively prohibits the use of most psychotropic/mood ameliorating medications. The FAA has approved approximately fifty (50) Class-One airmen and less than 200 pilots in any certification class have been approved under the FAA’s antidepressant protocol.

In early 2010 the FAA announced isolated approval of four(4) antidepressants known as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI’s) such as Celexa (Citalopram Hydrobromide), Lexapro (Escitalopram Oxalate), Prozac (Fluoxetine Hydrochloride), Zoloft (Sertraline Hydrochloride). Wellbutrin (Bupropion) was added in 2017 as another antidepressant which may also be acceptable on a case by case basis. Other medications not specifically listed may also be favorably considered by the FAA. While these medications may be approved, this rarely occurs and is generally not allowed if there is a significant medical diagnosis which requires medication to assure safe function and behavior.

The initial presentation of any psychiatric/psychological issue requires an evaluation irrespective of medication use. This should be performed for the FAA by a private physician and reviewed confidentially by an expert to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Attention Deficit
  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar
  • Personality Disorder
  • Substance Dependence or Abuse and the use of any psychotropic medication.

FAA psychiatric evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols. Before documentation is sent to the FAA it should be reviewed by an aeromedical document expert.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) are not authorized to approve certification for airmen with the aforementioned behavioral-medical history and they will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Throat – The initial presentation of any Ear, Nose or Throat anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by a private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes:

  • Any disease or condition of the middle or internal ear, nose, oral cavity, pharynx, or larynx which interferes with, or may be aggravated by flying.
  • Any disease or condition which may interfere with clear and effective speech communication.
  • A disease or condition which may be manifested by vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium.

FAA Ear, Nose and Throat evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements. Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Thyroid – Thyroid dysfunction requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for certification. FAA medical evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific FAA requirements.

In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Trauma – Injuries which with previous or current physical or medical deficits requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.
This includes but is not limited to:

  • Pain, Weakness
  • Paralysis
  • Motion coordination
  • Limited Range of Motion or Functionality
  • Cardiovascular or Neurological Dysfunction and the regular use of any anti-seizure, psychotropic, pain or anti-inflammatory medications.

Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements. In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Vision – View the FAA Medical Certification vision requirements here. You may also visit the links below for more specific vision-related resources.

*Federal Aviation Regulations (Part 61) require a person who holds a current medical certificate shall not act as pilot in command, or in any other capacity as a required pilot flight crew-member, while that person: Knows or has reason to know of any medical condition that would make the person unable to meet the requirements for the medical certificate necessary for the pilot operation; or Is taking medication or receiving other treatment for a medical condition that results in the person being unable to meet the requirements for the medical certificate necessary for the pilot operation. For operations that do not require a medical certificate, a person shall not act as pilot in command, or in any other capacity as a required pilot flight crew-member, while that person knows or has reason to know of any medical condition that would make the person unable to operate the aircraft in a safe manner.

Complete FAA Standards & Protocols  |  Eye Surgery  |  FAA Statistics

Will you pass the FAA’s eye exam?
Near Vision  |  Distant Vision  |  Visual Field  | Depth Perception  |  Color Vision

ADD – While the FAA does not routinely evaluate the behavioral health of pilots, they do require applicants to voluntarily report all mental issues since birth. Despite widespread miss-interpretation by many pilot associations, the present FAA policy effectively prohibits the use of most psychotropic/mood ameliorating medications. The FAA has approved approximately fifty (50) Class-One airmen and less than 200 pilots in any certification class have been approved under the FAA’s antidepressant protocol.

In early 2010 the FAA announced isolated approval of four(4) antidepressants known as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI’s) such as Celexa (Citalopram Hydrobromide), Lexapro (Escitalopram Oxalate), Prozac (Fluoxetine Hydrochloride), Zoloft (Sertraline Hydrochloride).  Wellbutrin (Bupropion) was added in 2017 as another antidepressant which may also be acceptable on a case by case basis. Other medications not specifically listed may also be favorably considered by the FAA. While these medications may be approved, this rarely occurs and is generally not allowed if there is a significant medical diagnosis which requires medication to assure safe function and behavior.

The initial presentation of any psychiatric/psychological issue requires an evaluation irrespective of medication use.  This should be performed for the FAA by a private physician and reviewed confidentially by an expert to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.  This includes but is not limited to:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Attention Deficit
  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar
  • Personality Disorder
  • Substance Dependence or Abuse and the use of any psychotropic medication.

FAA psychiatric evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.   Before documentation is sent to the FAA it should be reviewed by an aeromedical document expert.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) are not authorized to approve certification for airmen with the aforementioned behavioral-medical history and they will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

AGE – There is no minimum or maximum age required for an FAA medical. The minimum age for a student pilot certificate is 16, therefore, anyone under the age of 16 can only obtain a medical certificate instead of the combination medical / student pilot certificate which is typically issued. The oldest active pilot with current medical certificate was Ralph Charles who was born November 6, 1899 and passed away Sunday, February 2, at the age of 103. “There never was a medical basis for making retirement mandatory at age 60,” says Hale, a commercial pilot. “That’s why it changed.” David Hale, Pilot Medical Solutions, Inc. (AARP Bulletin)

AIDS – HIV seropositive pilots (without AIDS manifestations) using FDA / FAA approved antiviral medication may obtain FAA medical certification.  The FAA requires an evaluation which must be accomplished in compliance with specific FAA requirements. Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and must defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Alcohol – The following briefly outlines allergy and cold medications which are approved by the FAA* on a case by case basis:
OVER-THE-COUNTER MEDICATIONS
Sudafed (pseudoephedrine) and Entex (phenylpropanolamine) are approved by the FAA provided they are not combined with an antihistamine. Over the counter medications – FAA publication

OTHER MEDICATIONS
Vitamin B-12 or other prophylactic injections are approved provided there are no side effects. Astelin (Azelastine), Dymista (Azelastine HCl / Fluticasone propionate), Claritin (Loratadine), Clarinex (Desloratadine) and Allegra (Fexofenadine) are acceptable to the FAA provided there are no adverse effects.

APPROVED INHALERS

  • Afrin (Oxymetazoline Hydrochloride)
  • Astelin (Azelastine) Case specific only
  • Atrovent (Ipratropium) Case specific only
  • Beconase (Beclomethasone Dipropionate)
  • Flonase (Fluticasone Propionate)
  • Nasalcrom (Cromolyn Sodium)
  • Nasalide (Flunisolide)
  • Vancenase (Beclomethasone Dipropionate)

Sedating medications are not acceptable.  This includes but is not limited to: Cetirazine (Zyrtec)and Dipenhydramine (Benadryl).
*It is assumed that allergies or colds being treated are not chronic, or severe and that medications will be used short term as directed by a physician.
 Research which illustrates the dangers of OTC Allergy / Cold Medications

Allergies – The following briefly outlines allergy and cold medications which are approved by the FAA* on a case by case basis:

OVER-THE-COUNTER MEDICATIONS
Sudafed (pseudoephedrine) Entex (phenylpropanolamine) are approved by the FAA provided they are not combined with an antihistamine. Over the counter medications – FAA publication

OTHER MEDICATIONS
Vitamin B-12 or other prophylactic injections are approved provided there are no side effects. Astelin (Azelastine), Dymista (Azelastine HCl / Fluticasone propionate), Claritin (Loratadine), Clarinex (Desloratadine) and Allegra (Fexofenadine) are acceptable to the FAA provided there are no adverse effects.

APPROVED INHALERS

  • Afrin (Oxymetazoline Hydrochloride)
  • Astelin (Azelastine) Case specific only
  • Atrovent (Ipratropium) Case specific only
  • Beconase (Beclomethasone Dipropionate)
  • Flonase (Fluticasone Propionate)
  • Nasalcrom (Cromolyn Sodium)
  • Nasalide (Flunisolide)
  • Vancenase (Beclomethasone Dipropionate)

Sedating medications are not acceptable.  This includes but is not limited to: Cetirazine (Zyrtec)and Dipenhydramine (Benadryl). 
*It is assumed that allergies or colds being treated are not chronic, or severe and that medications will be used short term as directed by a physician. Research which illustrates the dangers of OTC Allergy / Cold Medications

Anxiety – While the FAA does not routinely evaluate the behavioral health of pilots, they do require applicants to voluntarily report all mental issues since birth. Despite widespread miss-interpretation by many pilot associations, the present FAA policy effectively prohibits the use of most psychotropic / mood ameliorating medications. The FAA has approved approximately fifty (50) Class-One airmen and less than 200 pilots in any certification class have been approved under the FAA’s antidepressant protocol. In early 2010 the FAA announced isolated approval of four(4) antidepressants known as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI’s) such as Celexa (Citalopram Hydrobromide), Lexapro (Escitalopram Oxalate), Prozac (Fluoxetine Hydrochloride), Zoloft (Sertraline Hydrochloride).  Wellbutrin (Bupropion) was added in 2017 as another antidepressant which may also be acceptable on a case by case basis. Other medications not specifically listed may also be favorably considered by the FAA. While these medications may be approved, this rarely occurs and is generally not allowed if there is a significant medical diagnosis which requires medication to assure safe function and behavior. The initial presentation of any psychiatric / psychological issue requires an evaluation irrespective of medication use.  This should be performed for the FAA by a private physician and reviewed confidentially by an expert to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.  This includes but is not limited to:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Attention Deficit
  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar
  • Personality Disorder
  • Substance Dependence or Abuse and the use of any psychotropic medication.

FAA psychiatric evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.   Before documentation is sent to the FAA it should be reviewed by an aeromedical document expert. Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) are not authorized to approve certification for airmen with the aforementioned behavioral-medical history and they will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Arrhythmias – The initial presentation of any cardiovascular anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your personal physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.
This includes but is not limited to:

Asthma – The initial presentation of any pulmonary anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes:

  • Asthma
  • COPD
  • Emphysema
  • Tuberculosis
  • Lobectomy
  • Any other conditions, diseases or medication use related to the lungs.

FAA pulmonary evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific protocol.  Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service

Back Problems – The initial presentation of any physical / musculoskeletal issue requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.  This includes but is not limited to:

  • Surgical Procedures
  • Pain
  • Weakness
  • Paralysis
  • Motion Coordination
  • Limited Range of Motion or Functionality
  • The regular use of pain or anti-inflammatory medications.FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements.  In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Blood Donation – Pilots with a diagnosis of hypertension or those on medication to control blood pressure must provide a detailed cardiovascular evaluation for FAA consideration.  While the FAA essentially has no absolute requirements, the FAA requires an explanatory narrative, written by the treating physician, which must address the cause of the high blood pressure and rule-out disqualifying conditions such as heart disease.  The FAA will also request lab-work which the treating physician required to establish his/her position along with any other documentation related to accepted medical care standards. While aviation medical examiners may defer lower values, the FAA disqualifies pilots with a systolic (higher number) blood pressure at or above 155 or a diastolic (lower number) pressure at or above 95.

 Blood Pressure Optimal  Normal  High Normal  Hypertension  FAA Limit
 Systolic (top #) <120 <130 130-139 140 or higher 155 or higher
 Diastolic < 80 < 85  85-90  90 or higher   95 or higher
  

If your blood pressure is elevated, speak with your physician about how to reduce your blood pressure.  It may be possible to reduce your blood pressure by limiting the sodium (salt) in your diet, losing weight if overweight, taking medication, limiting your alcohol intake and/or increasing your physical activity.

Although reducing your blood pressure by lifestyle modification is preferred, it may be best to utilize medication initially to reduce the risk for arterial damage and stroke.  Eventually exercise and diet may permit you to discontinue the medication.

FAA Certification – FAA approved medications for hypertension  |  Other Cardiovascular Issues  |  FAA Standards & Protocols

Bipolar – While the FAA does not routinely evaluate the behavioral health of pilots, they do require applicants to voluntarily report all mental issues since birth. Despite widespread miss-interpretation by many pilot associations, the present FAA policy effectively prohibits the use of most psychotropic / mood ameliorating medications. The FAA has approved approximately fifty (50) Class-One airmen and less than 200 pilots in any certification class have been approved under the FAA’s antidepressant protocol. In early 2010 the FAA announced isolated approval of four(4) antidepressants known as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI’s) such as Celexa (Citalopram Hydrobromide), Lexapro (Escitalopram Oxalate), Prozac (Fluoxetine Hydrochloride), Zoloft (Sertraline Hydrochloride).  Wellbutrin (Bupropion) was added in 2017 as another antidepressant which may also be acceptable on a case by case basis. Other medications not specifically listed may also be favorably considered by the FAA. While these medications may be approved, this rarely occurs and is generally not allowed if there is a significant medical diagnosis which requires medication to assure safe function and behavior. The initial presentation of any psychiatric / psychological issue requires an evaluation irrespective of medication use. This should be performed for the FAA by a private physician and reviewed confidentially by an expert to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Attention Deficit
  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar
  • Personality Disorder
  • Substance Dependence or Abuse and the use of any psychotropic medication.

FAA psychiatric evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.  Before documentation is sent to the FAA it should be reviewed by an aeromedical document expert. Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) are not authorized to approve certification for airmen with the aforementioned behavioral-medical history and they will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

BPH (Blood Pressure) – Pilots with a diagnosis of hypertension or those on medication to control blood pressure must provide a detailed cardiovascular evaluation for FAA consideration.  While the FAA essentially has no absolute requirements, the FAA requires an explanatory narrative, written by the treating physician, which must address the cause of the high blood pressure and rule-out disqualifying conditions such as heart disease.  The FAA will also request lab-work which the treating physician required to establish his/her position along with any other documentation related to accepted medical care standards.

While aviation medical examiners may defer lower values, the FAA disqualifies pilots with a systolic (higher number) blood pressure at or above 155 or a diastolic (lower number) pressure at or above 95.

Blood Pressure   Optimal  Normal  High Normal  Hypertension  FAA Limit
 Systolic (top #) <120 <130 130-139 140 or higher 155 or higher
 Diastolic < 80 < 85  85-90  90 or higher   95 or higher

If your blood pressure is elevated, speak with your physician about how to reduce your blood pressure.  It may be possible to reduce your blood pressure by limiting the sodium (salt) in your diet, losing weight if overweight, taking medication, limiting your alcohol intake and/or increasing your physical activity.

Although reducing your blood pressure by lifestyle modification is preferred, it may be best to utilize medication initially to reduce the risk of arterial damage and stroke.  Eventually, exercise and diet may permit you to discontinue the medication.
FAA Certification – FAA approved medications for hypertension  |  Other Cardiovascular Issues  |  FAA Standards & Protocols

CAD / CHD (Cardiovascular) – The initial presentation of any cardiovascular anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your personal physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.
This includes but is not limited to:

Cardiovascular evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA Protocol / Standards. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Cancer – The discovery of a malignant or benign mass requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements. Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification for most malignant cases and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Cataracts – Pilot Medical Solutions has helped thousands of pilots with aeromedical certification issues. We work directly with private physicians and the FAA to assure compliance with FAA medical protocols and to resolve complex aeromedical certification issues quickly. Contact us at 800-699-4457 or via E-Mail to confidentially discuss the details of your case and to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. There is no charge for the initial consultation.

Will you pass the FAA’s eye exam?
Near Vision  |  Distant Vision  |  Visual Field  | Depth Perception  |  Color Vision

Cold – The following briefly outlines allergy and cold medications which are approved by the FAA* on a case by case basis:
OVER-THE-COUNTER MEDICATIONS:
Sudafed (pseudoephedrine) Entex (phenylpropanolamine) are approved by the FAA provided they are not combined with an antihistamine. Over the counter medications – FAA publication

OTHER MEDICATIONS
Vitamin B-12 or other prophylactic injections are approved provided there are no side effects.
Astelin (Azelastine), Dymista (Azelastine HCl / Fluticasone propionate), Claritin (Loratadine), Clarinex (Desloratadine) and Allegra (Fexofenadine) are acceptable to the FAA provided there are no adverse effects.

APPROVED INHALERS

  • Afrin (Oxymetazoline Hydrochloride)
  • Astelin (Azelastine) Case specific only
  • Atrovent (Ipratropium) Case specific only
  • Beconase (Beclomethasone Dipropionate)
  • Flonase (Fluticasone Propionate)
  • Nasalcrom (Cromolyn Sodium)
  • Nasalide (Flunisolide)
  • Vancenase (Beclomethasone Dipropionate)

Sedating medications are not acceptable.  This includes but is not limited to: Cetirazine (Zyrtec)and Dipenhydramine (Benadryl).  Research which illustrates the dangers of OTC Allergy / Cold Medications
*It is assumed that allergies or colds being treated are not chronic, or severe and that medications will be used short term as directed by a physician.
Federal Air Surgeon’s Medical Bulletin Cold Meds Article

Color Vision – Take a Color Vision Screening Test
The FAA accepts several different tests to meet the color vision requirements. You must be able to differentiate between Aviation Signal Red, Green and White.  If you do not pass the test given by the FAA medical examiner, you may take an alternate test. An FAA administered light gun signal test is one option, however, if you fail, you will have a permanent restriction precluding night flight and flight requiring light signal control. We Can Help! We have helped thousands of pilots with this process. We assist you by working with a private ophthalmological facility / practitioner to obtain alternative color vision testing which is acceptable to the FAA.  After obtaining the essential records, we work directly with the FAA to obtain approval.

Cognitive – While Aviation Medical Examiners do not typically perform formal or complete psychiatric evaluations, the examiner is expected to form a general impression of the emotional stability and mental state of the applicant. When cognitive issues are discovered or suspected, the FAA typically requires neuropsychological testing such as the Cogscreen test developed by Gary Kay.  This testing often reveals areas of both strengths and weakness.  In certain cases, the areas of weakness can be expeditiously rehabilitated by clinical programs, online training and even game applications which have been designed to reduce certain cognitive deficits. Comprehensive cognitive fitness programs designed specifically for pilots are available from Pilot Medical Solutions. Please contact us for more information.

COPD – The initial presentation of any pulmonary anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes:

  • Asthma
  • COPD
  • Emphysema
  • Tuberculosis
  • Lobectomy
  • Any other conditions, diseases or medication use related to the lungs.

FAA pulmonary evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific protocol.  Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Depth Perception

First & Second Class – Regarding depth perception, the FAA requires that pilots applying for First and Second Class FAA Medical Certification have Bifoveal fixation and vergence-phoria relationship sufficient to prevent a break in fusion under conditions that may reasonably be expected to occur in performing airman duties. Tests for the factors named in this paragraph are not required except for persons found to have more than 1 prism diopter of hyperphoria, 6 prism diopters of esophoria, or 6 prism diopters of exophoria. If any of these values are exceeded, the Federal Air Surgeon may require the person to be examined by a qualified eye specialist to determine if there is bifoveal fixation and an adequate vergence-phoria relationship. However, if otherwise eligible, the person is issued a medical certificate pending the results of the examination.
Thirst Class – No acute or chronic pathological condition of either eye or adnexa that interferes with the proper function of an eye, that may reasonably be expected to progress to that degree, or that may reasonably be expected to be aggravated by flying.

Depression – While the FAA does not routinely evaluate the behavioral health of pilots, they do require applicants to voluntarily report all mental issues since birth. Despite widespread miss-interpretation by many pilot associations, the present FAA policy effectively prohibits the use of most psychotropic / mood ameliorating medications. The FAA has approved approximately fifty (50) Class-One airmen and less than 200 pilots in any certification class have been approved under the FAA’s antidepressant protocol. In early 2010 the FAA announced isolated approval of four(4) antidepressants known as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI’s) such as Celexa (Citalopram Hydrobromide), Lexapro (Escitalopram Oxalate), Prozac (Fluoxetine Hydrochloride), Zoloft (Sertraline Hydrochloride).  Wellbutrin (Bupropion) was added in 2017 as another antidepressant which may also be acceptable on a case by case basis. Other medications not specifically listed may also be favorably considered by the FAA. While these medications may be approved, this rarely occurs and is generally not allowed if there is a significant medical diagnosis which requires medication to assure safe function and behavior. The initial presentation of any psychiatric / psychological issue requires an evaluation irrespective of medication use.  This should be performed for the FAA by a private physician and reviewed confidentially by an expert to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.  This includes but is not limited to:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Attention Deficit
  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar
  • Personality Disorder
  • Substance Dependence or Abuse and the use of any psychotropic medication.

FAA psychiatric evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.  Before documentation is sent to the FAA it should be reviewed by an aeromedical document expert. Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) are not authorized to approve certification for airmen with the aforementioned behavioral-medical history and they will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Diabetes – The initial presentation of any carbohydrate metabolism disorder requires an evaluation be performed to establish eligibility for certification.   This includes: Insulin or Non-Insulin dependant diabetes, and the use of any hypoglycemic medication.  FAA evaluations must be accomplished
in compliance with specific protocols. In most cases, an FAA designated Aviation Medical Examiner (AME) cannot approve FAA medical certification and must defer the application to the actual FAA in Oklahoma City. The FAA has an established policy that permits Special Issuance medical certification to insulin treated applicants on a case by case basis. Applicants must provide extensive medical documentation. If the FAA grants medical certification, the airman will be required to adhere to monitoring requirements and they are prohibited from operating aircraft outside the United States. An insulin using diabetic airman must carry a recording glucometer and monitor readings during flight in compliance with the FAA’s protocol. While all classes of FAA medical certification will be considered by the FAA, the United States Federal Air Surgeon has determined that Insulin Using Diabetics cannot be approved by Aviation Medical Examiners.   Class 3 applicants may be approved by the FAA’s Civil Aerospace Medical Institute in Oklahoma City.  First and Second class applicants must be evaluated and may be authorized by the Federal Air Surgeon’s Office in Washington, D.C.. The deferral process typically takes several months without our service.

Drugs (illegal) – The diagnosis or history of: Alcoholism, Substance Dependence, or Substance Abuse is disqualifying in the absence of favorable clinical evidence. According to the FAA, “Substance” includes: Alcohol; other sedatives and hypnotics; anxiolytics; opiods; central nervous system stimulant such as cocaine, amphetamines, and similarly acting sympathomimetic; hallucinogens; phencyclidine or similarly acting arylcyclohexylamines; cannabis; inhalants; and other psychoactive drugs and chemicals. The FAA defines “Substance dependence” as: A condition in which a person is dependent on a substance, other than tobacco or ordinary xanthine-containing (e.g., caffeine) beverages as evidenced by:

  • Increased tolerance
  • Manifestation of withdrawal symptoms
  • Impaired control of use; or
  • Continued use despite damage to physical health or impairment of social, personal, or occupational functioning

These issues typically require documentation of sustained abstinence and a psychiatric evaluation performed in compliance with FAA medical protocols.  Again, this includes:

  • Alcoholism
  • DUI’s and DWI’s
  • The use of PCP, Sedatives, Hypnotics, Anxiolytics, Marijuana, Cocaine, Opiates, Amphetamines, Hallucinogens, or other psychoactive drugs or chemicals.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.  In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

DVT – The initial presentation of many medical issues requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols (FAA Forms & Protocols). Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.  In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

DUI / DWI – The diagnosis or history of: Alcoholism, Substance Dependence, or Substance Abuse is disqualifying in the absence of favorable clinical evidence. According to the FAA, “Substance” includes: Alcohol; other sedatives and hypnotics; anxiolytics; opiods; central nervous system stimulant such as cocaine, amphetamines, and similarly acting sympathomimetic; hallucinogens; phencyclidine or similarly acting arylcyclohexylamines; cannabis; inhalants; and other psychoactive drugs and chemicals. The FAA defines “Substance dependence” as: A condition in which a person is dependent on a substance, other than tobacco or ordinary xanthine-containing (e.g., caffeine) beverages as evidenced by:

  • Increased tolerance
  • Manifestation of withdrawal symptoms
  • Impaired control of use; or
  • Continued use despite damage to physical health or impairment of social, personal, or occupational functioning

These issues typically require documentation of sustained abstinence and a psychiatric evaluation performed in compliance with FAA medical protocols.  Again, this includes:

  • Alcoholism
  • DUI’s and DWI’s
  • The use of PCP, Sedatives, Hypnotics, Anxiolytics, Marijuana, Cocaine, Opiates, Amphetamines, Hallucinogens, or other psychoactive drugs or chemicals.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.  In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Ear, Nose, Throat – The initial presentation of any Ear, Nose or Throat anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by a private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes:

  • Any disease or condition of the middle or internal ear, nose, oral cavity, pharynx, or larynx which interferes with, or may be aggravated by flying.
  • Any disease or condition which may interfere with clear and effective speech communication.
  • A disease or condition which may be manifested by vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium.

FAA Ear, Nose and Throat evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements.  Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

EKG – The initial presentation of any cardiovascular anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your personal physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.
This includes but is not limited to:

Cardiovascular evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA Protocol / Standards. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Eye – Pilot Medical Solutions has helped thousands of pilots with aeromedical certification issues. We work directly with private physicians and the FAA to assure compliance with FAA medical protocols and to resolve complex aeromedical certification issues quickly. Contact us at 800-699-4457 or via E-Mail to confidentially discuss the details of your case and to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. There is no charge for the initial consultation.

Will you pass the FAA’s eye exam?  Find out below below.
Near Vision  |  Distant Vision  |  Visual Field  | Depth Perception  |  Color Vision

Erectile Dysfunction – The initial presentation of many medical issues requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.   FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols (FAA Forms & Protocols). Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.  In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

 

Fatigue Management – The initial presentation of a sleep disorder requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Insomnia
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Narcolepsy
  • Restless Leg Syndrome
  • The use of sleep aiding medication or devices.

Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific FAA protocol. Authorization should be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.  In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service. We can help! We have helped thousands of pilots with this process. We work directly with your physicians and the FAA to assure compliance with FAA protocols and to resolve complex aeromedical certification issues quickly. Contact us at 800-699-4457 or via E-Mail to confidentially discuss the details of your case and to establish your eligibility for FAA Medical certification. There is no charge for an initial consultation.
Sleep Disorder Glossary  |  FAA Sleep Disorder Protocol  | Obstructive Sleep Apnea
    Sleep Hygiene Tips
1. Do not go to bed until you are drowsy. Many people go to bed before they are sleepy in an attempt to catch up on lost sleep time. The problem is, they don’t sleep, but end up worrying about their daily issues. Delaying sleep until drowsiness increases the chances of falling asleep and strengthens the association between bed and drowsiness.
2. Go to bed and get up at the same time. Maintaining a consistent schedule is one of the important time cues for the 24-hour circadian sleep-wake rhythm.
3. Do not take naps. Problem sleepers should avoid this.
4. Reduce or eliminate the use of alcohol. Do not drink alcohol later than 3 hours before bedtime.
5. Reduce or eliminate the use of caffeine. Do not use caffeine within 6 hours of bedtime.
6. Reduce or eliminate the use of nicotine. Do not smoke within 4 hours of your bedtime.
7. Exercise regularly, but avoid strenuous physical exertion after 6:00 p.m.
8. Eat a light carbohydrate snack before bed (crackers or an apple).
9. Adjust the sleep environment so that the temperature is comfortable and there are minimal levels of light and noise.
10. Remove all work or reminders of stressful things from the bedroom.  The bedroom should be reserved for sleep, sex or other relaxation.

Fatigue ManagementTips to stay alert on night or extended shifts from USAF War Fighter Fatigue Countermeasures:

  • Use caffeine as a stimulant when needed

  • Eat low carbohydrate, low fat, and high protein foods

  • Use social interactions and physical activity to help stimulate you in your work environment

  • Stay cooler than usual

  • Gradually adjust your sleep time before going on night shift

  • Nap as much as possible before the night shift begin

USAF Fatigue Management  |  American Academy of Sleep Medicine  | Desynchronosis  |  Melatonin

Fibromyalgia – The initial presentation of any physical / musculoskeletal issue requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.  This includes but is not limited to:

  • Surgical Procedures
  • Pain
  • Weakness
  • Paralysis
  • Motion Coordination
  • Limited Range of Motion or Functionality
  • The regular use of pain or anti-inflammatory medications.FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements.  In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Flexibility – Achieving and maintaining good physical flexibility is one of the key elements for preventing injuries and improving physical function.  Pilots are especially vulnerable to back problems and other injuries due to the sedentary nature of the job. The stretches below are designed to increase range of motion and prevent injuries. Use as directed by your physician.

  • Warm-up prior to stretching with light aerobic activity such as: walking, biking, jogging, etc.  See rating of perceived exertion on our basic exercise guidelines to define personal intensity values.
  • Hold each stretch at a moderate tension for at least 20 seconds.
  • Breathe deeply and exhale while working into the stretch.

Fitness – “Pilot Medical Solutions has a program with the dual objectives of helping pilots get in shape and assisting them in negotiating the medical process.” – Flying Magazine
Below you will find links to pilot health and fitness resources. You may also wish to check out pilot safety brochures.

Gall Bladder – The initial presentation of many medical issues requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.   FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols (FAA Forms & Protocols). Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.  In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service. Gender Dysphoria

Glaucoma – The initial presentation of Glaucoma requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for certification.  Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific FAA protocol.

GERD / G.I. – The initial presentation of any gastrointestinal issue requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for certification.  This includes but is not limited to: Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases including regional enteritis (Crohns’s disease), ulcerative colitis, and the use of any medication to manage G.I. conditions. FAA gastrointestinal evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific protocol. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Headache – The initial presentation of any neurological anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification.  This includes but is not limited to:

  • Severe Headaches
  • Seizures
  • Disturbance of consciousness or nervous system function
  • The use of any medication for treatment of a neurological condition.

FAA Neurological evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Heart – The initial presentation of any cardiovascular anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your personal physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes but is not limited to:

  • Arrhythmias
  • Hypertension
  • Angina Pectoris
  • Murmurs
  • Myocardial Infarction (heart attack)
  • Cardiac Valve Replacement
  • Permanent Cardiac Pacemaker
  • Coronary Heart Disease
  • Heart Transplant
  • Cardiovascular medication use
  • Cardiovascular evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA Protocol / Standards.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Hearing – Most applicants for FAA Medical certification will pass the typical Aviation Medical Examiner test outlined on the audio test page. Those who do not, are usually certified with a nominal limitation placed on their medical certificate. Pilots who require a hearing aid to meet FAA medical requirements will have the limitation “VALID ONLY WITH USE OF HEARING AMPLIFICATION” on their FAA medical certificate. This requirement is easily met using a standard amplified aviation headset. To view the audio test page and additional hearing information visit the hearing page.

Herbs – Herbal preparations, vitamins and supplements, like conventional medications, may have some potential benefits but unlike FDA regulated drugs, supplements often have unexpected adverse effects. Some herbs or supplements may cause positive results on DOT / FAA drug testing. Another problem, that some supplements create for pilots, is their effect on blood pressure, heart rate or other readings obtained during an FAA medical examination.

When considering FAA medical certification eligibility keep in mind that the FAA considers the medical condition being treated first. Some conditions are disqualifying with or without medications.

Anyone considering the use of supplements should research all products apart from claims made by the manufacturer or health advisors lacking adequate credentials and consult a physician. The following acronym may help:

Get a blood test to determine if you are actually deficient before supplementing
Avoid mega-doses of anything
Take a multi-vitamin only as needed
Eat a well balanced diet

Despite claims to the contrary, food is the best source for vitamins and nutrients. The table below identifies the nutrients obtained from foods:

The information below is provided as general education only and should be considered as an overview for Aviation Medical Examiners and pilots.

ALWAYS CONSULT A PHYSICIAN PRIOR TO USE

Hepatitis – The diagnosis or history of hepatitis and the use of alpha interferon is disqualifying until the condition is resolved and favorable clinical evidence is provided to the FAA. A detailed evaluation by your treating physician should be performed in compliance with FAA protocol. This includes Hepatitis A, B, and C.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) will not approve certification and defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

HIV – HIV seropositive pilots (without AIDS manifestations) using FDA / FAA approved antiviral medication may obtain FAA medical certification. The FAA requires an evaluation which must be accomplished in compliance with specific FAA requirements.

Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and must defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Hypertension – Pilots with a diagnosis of hypertension or those on medication to control blood pressure must provide a detailed cardiovascular evaluation for FAA consideration. While the FAA essentially has no absolute requirements, the FAA requires an explanatory narrative, written by the treating physician, which must address the cause of the high blood pressure and rule-out disqualifying conditions such as heart disease. The FAA will also request lab-work which the treating physician required to establish his/her position along with any other documentation related to accepted medical care standards.

While aviation medical examiners may defer lower values, the FAA disqualifies pilots with a systolic (higher number) blood pressure at or above 155 or a diastolic (lower number) pressure at or above 95.

 Blood Pressure Optimal  Normal  High Normal  Hypertension  FAA Limit
 Systolic (top #) <120 <130 130-139 140 or higher 155 or higher
 Diastolic < 80 < 85  85-90  90 or higher   95 or higher

If your blood pressure is elevated, speak with your physician about how to reduce your blood pressure. It may be possible to reduce your blood pressure by limiting the sodium (salt) in your diet, losing weight if overweight, taking medication, limiting your alcohol intake and/or increasing your physical activity.

Although reducing your blood pressure by lifestyle modification is preferred, it may be best to utilize medication initially to reduce the risk for arterial damage and stroke. Eventually exercise and diet may permit you to discontinue the medication.

Illegal Drugs – The diagnosis or history of: Alcoholism, Substance Dependence, or Substance Abuse is disqualifying in the absence of favorable clinical evidence.

According to the FAA, “Substance” includes: Alcohol; other sedatives and hypnotics; anxiolytics; opiods; central nervous system stimulant such as cocaine, amphetamines, and similarly acting sympathomimetic; hallucinogens; phencyclidine or similarly acting arylcyclohexylamines; cannabis; inhalants; and other psychoactive drugs and chemicals.

The FAA defines “Substance dependence” as: A condition in which a person is dependent on a substance, other than tobacco or ordinary xanthine-containing (e.g., caffeine) beverages as evidenced by:

  • Increased tolerance
  • Manifestation of withdrawal symptoms
  • Impaired control of use; or
  • Continued use despite damage to physical health or impairment of social, personal, or occupational functioning

These issues typically require documentation of sustained abstinence and a psychiatric evaluation performed in compliance with FAA medical protocols. Again, this includes:

  • Alcoholism
  • DUI’s and DWI’s
  • The use of PCP, Sedatives, Hypnotics, Anxiolytics, Marijuana, Cocaine, Opiates, Amphetamines, Hallucinogens, or other psychoactive drugs or chemicals.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Injury – Injuries which with previous or current physical or medical deficits requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.
This includes but is not limited to:

  • Pain, Weakness
  • Paralysis
  • Motion coordination
  • Limited Range of Motion or Functionality
  • Cardiovascular or Neurological Dysfunction and the regular use of any anti-seizure, psychotropic, pain or anti-inflammatory medications.

Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements. In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Insomnia – The initial presentation of a sleep disorder requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes but is not limited to:

  • Insomnia
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Narcolepsy
  • Restless Leg Syndrome
  • The use of sleep aiding medication or devices.

Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific FAA protocol.

Authorization should be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Intestinal – The initial presentation of any gastrointestinal issue requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for certification. This includes but is not limited to: Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases including regional enteritis (Crohns’s disease), ulcerative colitis, and the use of any medication to manage G.I. conditions.

FAA gastrointestinal evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific protocol.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Impotence – the initial presentation of many medical issues requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols (FAA Forms & Protocols). Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Immunization – While there is no published FAA position regarding immunizations, the FAA has suggested that a wait period of as much as 24 hours be utilized to observe any adverse effects. While there is no reporting requirements, pilots who have been immunized may wish to provide a note from the prescribing physician at the time of their next FAA exam. Read More by reading Immunizations and Flying By Major Donato J. Borrillo, MD, JD.

Kidney Stones – The history of kidney dysfunction requires an evaluation be provided, by your treating physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Renal(kidney) stones
  • Kidney failure
  • Nephritis
  • Nephrosis
  • Polycystic kidney disease
  • Pyelitis/pyelonephritis
  • Pyonephrosis
  • Tumors or malignancies and Nephrectomy.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Kidney Failure – The history of kidney dysfunction requires an evaluation be provided, by your treating physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Renal(kidney) stones
  • Kidney failure
  • Nephritis
  • Nephrosis
  • Polycystic kidney disease
  • Pyelitis/pyelonephritis
  • Pyonephrosis
  • Tumors or malignancies and Nephrectomy.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

LASIK – Eye or vision surgeries require a post-operative evaluation be performed by your private physician to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA protocol.

Leukemia – The initial presentation of many medical issues requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.

FAA Forms & Protocols

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Lyme Disease – The initial presentation of many medical issues requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.

FAA Forms & Protocols

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Lung Disease – The initial presentation of any pulmonary anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes:

  • Asthma
  • COPD
  • Emphysema
  • Tuberculosis
  • Lobectomy
  • Any other conditions, diseases or medication use related to the lungs.

FAA pulmonary evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific protocol. Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Melanoma – The discovery of a malignant or benign mass requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements.

Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification for most malignant cases and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Menier’s Disease – The initial presentation of motion sickness, dizziness or vertigo requires an evaluation be performed to establish the underlying cause and to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This is especially true if a medication has been utilized to treat or prevent motion sickness.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Mental – While the FAA does not routinely evaluate the behavioral health of pilots, they do require applicants to voluntarily report all mental issues since birth. Despite widespread miss-interpretation by many pilot associations, the present FAA policy effectively prohibits the use of most psychotropic / mood ameliorating medications. The FAA has approved approximately fifty (50) Class-One airmen and less than 200 pilots in any certification class have been approved under the FAA’s antidepressant protocol.

In early 2010 the FAA announced isolated approval of four(4) antidepressants known as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI’s) such as Celexa (Citalopram Hydrobromide), Lexapro (Escitalopram Oxalate), Prozac (Fluoxetine Hydrochloride), Zoloft (Sertraline Hydrochloride). Wellbutrin (Bupropion) was added in 2017 as another antidepressant which may also be acceptable on a case by case basis. Other medications not specifically listed may also be favorably considered by the FAA. While these medications may be approved, this rarely occurs and is generally not allowed if there is a significant medical diagnosis which requires medication to assure safe function and behavior.

The initial presentation of any psychiatric / psychological issue requires an evaluation irrespective of medication use. This should be performed for the FAA by a private physician and reviewed confidentially by an expert to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Attention Deficit
  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar
  • Personality Disorder
  • Substance Dependence or Abuse and the use of any psychotropic medication.

FAA psychiatric evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols. Before documentation is sent to the FAA it should be reviewed by an aeromedical document expert.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) are not authorized to approve certification for airmen with the aforementioned behavioral-medical history and they will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Migraine – The initial presentation of any neurological anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Severe Headaches
  • Seizures
  • Disturbance of consciousness or nervous system function
  • The use of any medication for treatment of a neurological condition.

FAA Neurological evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Motion Sickness – The initial presentation of motion sickness, dizziness or vertigo requires an evaluation be performed to establish the underlying cause and to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This is especially true if a medication has been utilized to treat or prevent motion sickness.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Multiple Sclerosis – The initial presentation of any neurological anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Severe Headaches
  • Seizures
  • Disturbance of consciousness or nervous system function
  • The use of any medication for treatment of a neurological condition.

FAA Neurological evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Myopia (nearsighted) – Pilot Medical Solutions has helped thousands of pilots with aeromedical certification issues. We work directly with private physicians and the FAA to assure compliance with FAA medical protocols and to resolve complex aeromedical certification issues quickly.

Contact us at 800-699-4457 or via E-Mail to confidentially discuss the details of your case and to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. There is no charge for the initial consultation.

Nose – The initial presentation of any Ear, Nose or Throat anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by a private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes:

  • Any disease or condition of the middle or internal ear, nose, oral cavity, pharynx, or larynx which interferes with, or may be aggravated by flying.
  • Any disease or condition which may interfere with clear and effective speech communication.
  • A disease or condition which may be manifested by vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium.

FAA Ear, Nose and Throat evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements. Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Neurology – The initial presentation of any neurological anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Severe Headaches
  • Seizures
  • Disturbance of consciousness or nervous system function
  • The use of any medication for treatment of a neurological condition.

FAA Neurological evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Nutrition – Good nutrition is added insurance for FAA Medical Certification. Eating right has several other benefits including: Blood Pressure and Cholesterol stabilization, the prevention of Heart Disease, weight management, the prevention or control of Diabetes, and equilibration of many other health parameters. Exercise also assures optimal health.
Contact Pilot Medical Solutions to receive individualized recommendations.

– Focus on things you should eat, not what you can’t eat
– Plan meals ahead with large quantities of low or non-fat food
– Get at least 7 hours of sleep nightly
– Drink plenty of water

Consult your physician before beginning any exercise or nutritional program.

Oncology – The discovery of a malignant or benign mass requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements.

Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification for most malignant cases and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Orthopaedics – The initial presentation of any physical / musculoskeletal issue requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

Physical – The initial presentation of any physical / musculoskeletal issue requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Surgical Procedures
  • Pain
  • Weakness
  • Paralysis
  • Motion Coordination
  • Limited Range of Motion or Functionality
  • The regular use of pain or anti-inflammatory medications.

FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements. In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Pain – Any chronic condition manifesting pain or requiring pain medication should be evaluated by your physician to determine if you can comply with FAR 61.53. Chronic conditions or those causing severe or limiting pain will be evaluated by the FAA to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. More Info: Pain Syndromes

FAA medical evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific FAA requirements.

Authorization should be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. Typically Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) will not approve certification and may defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

PregnancyFlying Pregnant – More than one solution for pregnant pilots and their employers

The guide to medical examiners states that performing flight duties is allowed during “normal” pregnancy. Normal is a relative term. Certainly there are unique medical and flight safety risk factors which are present even at conception. Even during the simplest of pregnancies, many women experience fatigue and nausea during the first trimester and almost all women experience fatigue and or nausea at some point during pregnancy.

One-third of pregnant women will deliver prior to their due date and 100% will be completely disabled at some point during pregnancy, yet the FAA’s only regulatory guidance is FAR 61.53. When paraphrased FAR 61.53 essentially says pilots must ground themselves if they know or have reason to know of any medical condition that would make them unable to meet the requirements or if they are taking medication or receiving treatment for a medical condition that renders them unable to meet the requirements. There is a wide range of interpretations of FAR 61.53 for pregnant pilots and while some believe these pilots should be grounded in the first trimester, others believe moms-to-be can fly two weeks beyond their due date.

Airline operators have long recognized the potential for negative outcomes in late pregnancy. Those not already on paid leave are usually transitioned to a desk job by the 30th week. While this is a workable solution for most airlines, fractional jet operators and corporate pilots may have fewer options.

Monetary and legal issues often eliminate options for corporate flyers, which are readily available to their airline counterparts.
In some cases pilots continue flying in order to remain on pay status while reducing safety margins for mother, baby and passengers.

Factors which may considerably reduce flight safety and classify a pregnancy as “abnormal” include: A history of multiple pregnancies, previous pre-term deliveries, cervical incompetence, bleeding, increased uterine activity,
reduced oxygen carrying capacity in the blood (anemia), reduced placential respiratory reserve such as intrauterine growth retardation, postmaturity, pre-eclampsia, chronic hypertension or placental infarction.

Flight during pregnancy increases the risk for:

  • Edema (swelling) and blood clot formation due to obstruction of the vena cava from uterine compression and lack of mobility
  • Reduced timely medical response due to the flight environment
  • Placental abruption which can be associated with minor abdominal traumaAdditional considerations include:
    Morning sickness, motion sickness, cockpit confinement, abdominal crowding-related to altitude expansion, control operation, baggage handling, frequent urination, difficulty in equalizing pressure due to tissue hyperplasia
    and passengers perception.

No two pilot pregnancies are alike. What is safe for one may be risky for another. Different flight operations require women to be informed and aware of the unique risk factors related not only to their pregnancy but to their specific flight operation. Employers should be as supportive as possible while advising pilots to consider both personal and flight safety ramifications.

Flying by the numbers – Most Pre-term deliveries occur after 28weeks. The odds are, most pilots will have a normal flight as most women will have a normal pregnancy. But if safety is the prime objective the pregnant pilot should honestly consider both FAR 61.53 and their fitness/functionality for events such as extreme turbulence or a crash. Pregnancy requires 9-14 doctor visits and 15-20% of women are hospitalized for non-delivery care. Women may have secondary problems from pregnancy such as poor / inadequate sleep, generalized discomfort, mood swings and urinary infections.

Most pilots would agree that taking unnecessary risks during flying is poor judgment but few pilots ask themselves the hard questions when they feel they must fly. Pregnant pilots should ask themselves hard questions:

(1) Is this pregnancy normal?
(2) Does this pregnancy pose significant vulnerabilities?
(3) Is flying this airplane or this specific flight operation risky for this pregnant pilot?
(4) Would I take this flight if it were not for the money?
(5) Am I taking an unnecessary risk?

If you have a high-risk pregnancy, we can help!

We have helped thousands of pilots with this process. We work directly with private physicians and the FAA to assure compliance with FAA regulations, to solve corporate obstacles and to resolve complex aeromedical certification issues quickly.

Presbyopia (farsightedness) – Pilot Medical Solutions has helped thousands of pilots with aeromedical certification issues. We work directly with private physicians and the FAA to assure compliance with FAA medical protocols and to resolve complex aeromedical certification issues quickly.

Contact us at 800-699-4457 or via E-Mail to confidentially discuss the details of your case and to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. There is no charge for the initial consultation.

Will you pass the FAA’s eye exam? Find out below.

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Prostate – The initial presentation of a prostate condition requires an evaluation be performed to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes: prostate cancer, benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), and the use of medication to prevent or treat these conditions.

FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific medical protocol.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. Typically Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) will not approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Pulmonary – The initial presentation of any pulmonary anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes:

  • Asthma
  • COPD
  • Emphysema
  • Tuberculosis
  • Lobectomy
  • Any other conditions, diseases or medication use related to the lungs.

FAA pulmonary evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific protocol. Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Range of Motion – The initial presentation of any physical/musculoskeletal issue requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Surgical Procedures
  • Pain
  • Weakness
  • Paralysis
  • Motion Coordination
  • Limited Range of Motion or Functionality
  • The regular use of pain or anti-inflammatory medications.

FAA evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements. In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Restless Leg Syndrome – The initial presentation of a sleep disorder requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes but is not limited to:

  • Insomnia
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Narcolepsy
  • Restless Leg Syndrome
  • The use of sleep aiding medication or devices.
  • Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific FAA protocol.

Authorization should be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Seizures – The initial presentation of any neurological anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish your eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Severe Headaches
  • Seizures
  • Disturbance of consciousness or nervous system function
  • The use of any medication for treatment of a neurological condition.

FAA Neurological evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Sleep Disorder – The initial presentation of a sleep disorder requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes but is not limited to:

  • Insomnia
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Narcolepsy
  • Restless Leg Syndrome
  • The use of sleep aiding medication or devices.

Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific FAA protocol.

Authorization should be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Smoking – The benefits of becoming smoke-free

While cigarette smoking is not prohibited by the FAA, it has several hazardous side effects and many health conditions caused by smoking are medically disqualifying.

A smoker typically carries a carbon monoxide blood level of about five percent. This may raise your physiological altitude from sea level to about 7,000 feet. A smoker is much more susceptible to hypoxia and can often feel the effects of hypoxia at lower altitudes.

Those who quit smoking immediately reduce their health risks and quickly derive many benefits:

  • Your chances of getting sick from smoking will be less.
  • You will have more energy and breathe easier.
  • If you are pregnant, your baby will get more oxygen and be healthier.
  • The people you live with, especially your children, will be healthier. Breathing in other people’s smoke can cause asthma and other health problems.
  • You will have more money to spend on things other than cigarettes.

There Has Never Been a Better Time to Quit
Smoking Cessation Tips:

  1. Assess the reasons you want to stop smoking and what stands in your way.
  2. Customize your stop smoking program by creating a plan which considers all obstacles and rallies all available support.
  3. Make plans to stop smoking.

More Information

Stent Implantation – The initial presentation of any cardiovascular anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your personal physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes but is not limited to:

Cardiovascular evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA Protocol / Standards.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Stomach – The initial presentation of any gastrointestinal issue requires an evaluation be performed, by your private physician, to establish eligibility for certification. This includes but is not limited to: Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases including regional enteritis (Crohns’s disease), ulcerative colitis, and the use of any medication to manage G.I. conditions.

FAA gastrointestinal evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with a specific protocol.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Substance Abuse – The diagnosis or history of: Alcoholism, Substance Dependence, or Substance Abuse is disqualifying in the absence of favorable clinical evidence.

According to the FAA, “Substance” includes: Alcohol; other sedatives and hypnotics; anxiolytics; opiods; central nervous system stimulant such as cocaine, amphetamines, and similarly acting sympathomimetic; hallucinogens; phencyclidine or similarly acting arylcyclohexylamines; cannabis; inhalants; and other psychoactive drugs and chemicals.

The FAA defines “Substance dependence” as: A condition in which a person is dependent on a substance, other than tobacco or ordinary xanthine-containing (e.g., caffeine) beverages as evidenced by:

  • Increased tolerance
  • Manifestation of withdrawal symptoms
  • Impaired control of use; or
  • Continued use despite damage to physical health or impairment of social, personal, or occupational functioning

These issues typically require documentation of sustained abstinence and a psychiatric evaluation performed in compliance with FAA medical protocols. Again, this includes:

  • Alcoholism
  • DUI’s and DWI’s
  • The use of PCP, Sedatives, Hypnotics, Anxiolytics, Marijuana, Cocaine, Opiates, Amphetamines, Hallucinogens, or other psychoactive drugs or chemicals.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Stroke – The initial presentation of any cardiovascular anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by your personal physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes but is not limited to:

Cardiovascular evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA Protocol / Standards.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA for authorization. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Suicide Attempt – While the FAA does not routinely evaluate the behavioral health of pilots, they do require applicants to voluntarily report all mental issues since birth. Despite widespread miss-interpretation by many pilot associations, the present FAA policy effectively prohibits the use of most psychotropic/mood ameliorating medications. The FAA has approved approximately fifty (50) Class-One airmen and less than 200 pilots in any certification class have been approved under the FAA’s antidepressant protocol.

In early 2010 the FAA announced isolated approval of four(4) antidepressants known as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI’s) such as Celexa (Citalopram Hydrobromide), Lexapro (Escitalopram Oxalate), Prozac (Fluoxetine Hydrochloride), Zoloft (Sertraline Hydrochloride). Wellbutrin (Bupropion) was added in 2017 as another antidepressant which may also be acceptable on a case by case basis. Other medications not specifically listed may also be favorably considered by the FAA. While these medications may be approved, this rarely occurs and is generally not allowed if there is a significant medical diagnosis which requires medication to assure safe function and behavior.

The initial presentation of any psychiatric/psychological issue requires an evaluation irrespective of medication use. This should be performed for the FAA by a private physician and reviewed confidentially by an expert to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Attention Deficit
  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar
  • Personality Disorder
  • Substance Dependence or Abuse and the use of any psychotropic medication.

FAA psychiatric evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific protocols. Before documentation is sent to the FAA it should be reviewed by an aeromedical document expert.

Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City. Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) are not authorized to approve certification for airmen with the aforementioned behavioral-medical history and they will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Throat – The initial presentation of any Ear, Nose or Throat anomaly requires an evaluation be performed, by a private physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.

This includes:

  • Any disease or condition of the middle or internal ear, nose, oral cavity, pharynx, or larynx which interferes with, or may be aggravated by flying.
  • Any disease or condition which may interfere with clear and effective speech communication.
  • A disease or condition which may be manifested by vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium.

FAA Ear, Nose and Throat evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements. Authorization must be obtained from the Aeromedical Certification Division of the FAA in Oklahoma City.

In most cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) do not approve certification and will defer the application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Thyroid – Thyroid dysfunction requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for certification. FAA medical evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with specific FAA requirements.

In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Trauma – Injuries which with previous or current physical or medical deficits requires an evaluation be performed, by your physician, to establish eligibility for FAA medical certification.
This includes but is not limited to:

  • Pain, Weakness
  • Paralysis
  • Motion coordination
  • Limited Range of Motion or Functionality
  • Cardiovascular or Neurological Dysfunction and the regular use of any anti-seizure, psychotropic, pain or anti-inflammatory medications.

Evaluations must be accomplished in compliance with FAA requirements. In many cases, Aviation Medical Examiners (AME’s) cannot approve certification and will defer your application to Oklahoma City FAA. The deferral process usually takes 4-6 months without our service.

Vision – View the FAA Medical Certification vision requirements here. You may also visit the links below for more specific vision-related resources.

Complete FAA Standards & Protocols  |  Eye Surgery  |  FAA Statistics

Will you pass the FAA’s eye exam?
Near Vision  |  Distant Vision  |  Visual Field  | Depth Perception  |  Color Vision

Contact us at 1-800-699-4457 or by email here
to confidentially discuss your FAA medical issues.